Monthly Archives: August 2016

A Diplomat Tips

unduhan-1Diplomats or office officers (FSOs) add countries across the world to help voters and any their countries interests and policies abroad. reckoning on the career track, diplomats may match in diplomatic building services, economic interests, management, politics, or public diplomacy. office offices use people with all completely different backgrounds and experience as a result of they have FSOs UN agency square measure versatile, creative, and convertible. office positions square measure usually short, with assignments starting from months to many years, however the one constant in diplomatic work is that FSOs should be ready to adapt quickly and assess the priorities of a state of affairs or project. whereas the task might not be as exciting as it’s created dead set be in movies and television, FSOs have the opportunities to measure abroad in an exceedingly type of countries and things and acquire active expertise with new cultures, people, and societies. office is not for everybody, except for hard-working, impelled people with a need to measure and travel abroad, diplomatic employment is associate degree exciting choice. If you’re thinking that that a career as a remote service officer is correct for you, here’s the way to steel oneself against employment in office.

1. It depends on your homeland
The track to diplomatic careers differs depending on where you call home, but in most countries, foreign service officers, or their equivalent, are subject to similar requirements. Many countries require FSOs to be citizens of the country they will be representing. In the US, FSOs must be between the ages of 20 and 59 to qualify for service. But in general, countries are looking for FSOs with diverse skills, qualifications, and personal aptitude because each position is unique and presents its own challenges. Diplomats work on projects related to everything from sporting events to disease outbreaks, education initiatives, and peacekeeping. There is no one skill-set needed for diplomacy, but a willingness to listen and understand situations is a must.

2. Some degrees give you an upper hand
In the US, diplomats hold a variety of education levels ranging from high school diplomas to PhDs, and in the US, the UK, and other countries the first step to qualifying for a diplomatic career is passing a general aptitude test. These exams normally assess a candidate’s overall knowledge, so it’s important that prospective FSOs brush up on things like mathematics, reading comprehension, and logic. But a solid foundation from a degree in history, politics, law, or human rights will be a plus. Most foreign service offices also recommend that applicants be well-read and informed on current events, government, and international politics – essentially, if you’re serious about a diplomatic career, you should be reading a lot of newspapers.

3. Brush up your language skills
In the US, foreign language proficiency is not required for a diplomatic position because all successful applicants receive language training before their first post. However, fluency in a second or third language, as well as international experiences, will help your application stand out. Languages like Chinese, Arabic, Farsi, and Urdu are in high demand, but it’s more important to have strong written and spoken communication skills in your own language. After candidates have passed the entrance exam, most foreign service offices subject applicants to rigorous interviews and assessments aimed at identifying individual strengths and suitability.

4. Prepare for challenges…and competition
Foreign service is a challenging career. FSOs are always moving, which means that staying in touch with loved ones can be tricky, and for officers with families, the position can be taxing. But that doesn’t mean that foreign service is an unpopular career, and most foreign service offices have a large pool of new FSOs waiting for deployment as well as an established rank of officers, all of whom are competing for the choice assignments around the world. Placements are often given out based on rank, and new recruits should expect their first assignments to be in areas or regions that are more challenging than others. Successful FSOs learn to make the best out of tricky situations, know when to ask for favors, and work hard to succeed.

All About Retirement Planning

The old adage insists that “a penny saved is a penny earned.” Unfortunately, this can be easier said than done — particularly for students and entry-level employees who may not yet be raking in the big bucks. But there’s also a saying that goes, “Why put off for tomorrow what you can do today?” And the truth is that regardless of the amount you earn, you can and should be thinking about retirement. Let’s count down four strategies aimed at turning today’s pennies into tomorrow’s savings.

1. Have a Financial Plan
Just because retirement is still 20,30 or even 40 years into the future doesn’t mean you can’t have a plan in place aimed at helping you reach your goals along the way. The first step in planning for the future is having a plan in the first place.

Begin by considering both your immediate and long-term financial goals. Be as thorough as possible, including everything from daily needs like groceries and commuting costs to more significant objectives, such as home ownership. Write these things down. Not only does research indicate that writing down your goals can help you reach them, but this list will become a touchpoint over the years.

After you’ve prepared your financial goals, your next step is to determine a “big picture” comprehensive budget to determine what it will take to get you there. Luckily, a number of free online resources exist to help you with this part of the process. Sites like Voya Financial’s Home Budget & Savings Calculator are a great way to see where your money is going and how to start saving.

2. Start Saving
Saving money is a habit. The sooner your start, the sooner it will become something you don’t even have to think about. Not to mention that you can’t miss what you never had to begin with, which is why workplace retirement savings plans — such as 401(k)s and Roth IRAs — which be set up to auto-deduct a preset amount from your paycheck, can be an invaluable financial jumpstart. Not only are these funds tax-deferrable, but many employers will also match your contribution.

By saving early, you can maximize what you’ll have in the long run. Consider a scenario shared by Bankrate revealing the difference between saving $2,000 a year beginning at age 35 and the same amount beginning 10 years earlier at age 25. With the former setup (assuming 8 percent earnings), you’ll reach the age of retirement with approximately $245,000. This may sound okay…until you consider that the 25-year-old saver would have racked up $560,000 — more than twice that of the 35-year-old saver.

The best part of starting to save now? Once you’ve got everything set up, all you have to do is kick back and watch your nest egg grow. And even if you can only spare a small amount now, you can adjust how much is being deducted as your financial situation improves.

3. Manage Your Debt
When it comes to four-letter words, this one is enough to strike fear in the heart of any financial planner: debt. Unfortunately, failure to understand the impact of debt — from student loans to credit card debt — from the onset can result in an unpleasant snowball effect. While completely avoiding debt may be an unrealistic expectation, having a plan to pay down your debt can prevent it from escalating. Experts suggest building paying off loans into your budget calculations, starting by tackling debt with the highest interest rates first.

One caveat? While your instinct may be to throw everything you’ve got at your debt toward a “clean slate,” delaying retirement contributions while failing to establishment a critical “rainy day” fund can be a slippery slope. Why? Because saving for retirement doesn’t necessarily get easier as you get older due to the accumulation of new financial responsibilities throughout life. In many cases, maxing our your retirement contributions while establishing a less aggressive loan repayment plan can lead to better financial outcomes.

4. Factor in Insurance

While you may automatically gain access to health insurance during your student days, it’s important to realize that your insurance needs won’t be static throughout your life. Depending on dynamic factors like debts and dependents, you may need varying health, life, and other forms of insurance. Reassessing your needs along the way can help ensure that you have enough coverage should a major life event or unexpected emergency arise.

Are You a Tourism Studies

Travel is one of the most popular hobbies shared by people all over the world. After all, there’s no better way to discover new adventures, experience new things, and make new friends than by traveling to far-off places. Just how popular is travel? Peopleandtheplanet.com says, “By some measures, tourism may already be the world’s largest industry, with annual revenue approaching $500 billion.”

Of course, few people can spend all of their time traveling. Why not? Because earning a living has to enter the picture at some point. But following your wanderlust and having a job don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Tourism, hospitality, and leisure studies prepare students to take on vital roles in this sought-after sector while simultaneously supporting the love of travel. Not sure where to begin? Read on for six of our picks for top destinations for tourism degrees.

1. Sweden
If IKEA, ABBA and Volvo are the extent of your knowledge of Sweden, it may be time to broaden your horizons. Considered by many to be one of the planet’s most livable places, Sweden is known for its gender equality, gorgeous scenery (and inhabitants), rich history, and sustainability.

Sweden is also celebrated for its strong degree programs in tourism, including Mid Sweden University’s Master in Tourism Studies. This year-long program, drawn from leading tourism research entity the European Tourism Research Institute, offers degrees in two disciplines: tourism studies and human geography. Students learn through a number of different modes, including everything from independent research to field trips. And what better place to learn more about sustainable development than Sweden? Looking to do some travel of your own while you’re there? Mid Sweden University’s campus is situated in Östersund — close to both Swedish and Norwegian mountain ranges with easy proximity to Europe’s other leading destinations.

2. Switzerland
Switzerland has long been lauded as a premier international study destination for its unbeatable combination of quality of life and top universities. But did you know that Switzerland also has a legacy as the “birthplace of hospitality”? Home to the world’s first grand, palace-style hotels, Switzerland has played host to international luminaries drawn to everything from the country’s precision to its innovation.

More than 100 years later, Switzerland continues to set the standard in the hospitality industry, making it an unbeatable place to study tourism in programs like the Sustainability Management School’s Master in Sustainable Tourism and Protected Areas (MAM), The University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur’s MSc Business Administration in Tourism, ESOAD’s Master Européen de Management et Stratégie Touristique, and UIBS’s Master in Business Studies — Tourism and Hospitality Management.

3. The United States
More than 75 million people traveled to the U.S. in 2014, according to figures from the World Bank. And the vast majority of them need lodging, food, and other guidance along the way regarding how to best experience the country Lonely Planet describes as a “watercolor masterpiece.”

What makes the US a great place to study tourism? For starters, the breadth and depth of its offerings across hundreds of courses and programs, many of which are located in the country’s biggest tourism destinations. Factor in a commitment to innovation and top global rankings, and it’s no surprise that world’s most prestigious hospitality companies recruit grads with tourism degrees from the U.S.

4. Thailand
As tourism to Thailand continues to rise, so does the appeal of hospitality studies in this vibrant and visually stunning destination. The recent boom in English language course in Thailand means there are plenty of options for English speakers — as well as those looking to hone their English language skills — amidst Thailand’s hospitality degrees.

Have a love of tourism and a mind for business? Consider the Bangkok School of Management’s MBA in International Tourism Management to position yourself for a leadership role in this red-hot industry.

5. France
France is one of the world’s most visited countries, with Paris alone laying claim to 45 million tourists annually. Why do so many people yearn to visit the city of lights? In addition to its amazing food, breathtaking architecture, and impossibly chic people, France is also known for its unparalleled offerings when it comes to tourism and hospitality.

If you’re looking to immerse yourself in a consummate learning experience, look no further than France’s tourism degreesfocused on everything from hotel management to global tourism with applications across multiple sectors including hotels and resorts, restaurants, spas, wellness centers, theme parks, and many others.

6. The Netherlands

In attempting to encapsulate the many charms of The Netherlands, Lonely Planet writer Catherine Le Nevez enthuses, “What I love about the country above all is its spirit. If something doesn’t exist, the Dutch will design it, build it, manufacture it, recycle it, craft it, launch it (the Netherlands is one of the world’s hottest startup hubs) and make it a reality. There’s a sense that anything’s possible here (and it invariably is).”

While this remarkable national attitude makes The Netherlands a wonderful place to visit, it also makes it an exceptional destination for students in the cutting-edge field of tourism. With so much growth and so many ongoing changes, businesses in this industry must evolve just to keep up. The Netherlands’ fusion of tradition and innovation make its tourism degree programs ideal environments for fostering the skills necessary to survive and thrive in a multifaceted career in tourism.

According to the world tourism organization UNWTO, tourism accounts for 12 percent of all jobs. Are you ready to step into one of them? A tourism degree from one of these six countries — or from another tourism program destination of your choosing — can help you get your tourism career journey off to a terrific start.